Veriditas By Pranarom

Essential Asana: Wild Sage Hydrosol As A Smokeless Smudge


What is Smudging?

Burning herbs like Sage and Lavender bundled together has been done in rituals and religious ceremonies all over the world dating back centuries. Burning the herbs in this way was believed to cleanse, purify, and clear spiritual and emotional negativity in the body and the space, preparing them for sacred ceremonies.
There is some scientific evidence to back this up. Smudging with sage has been proven to kill over 90% of airborne bacteria. Smudging fills the space with negative ions which eliminate positive ions, cleaning and purifying the air. Increasing negative ions in the air increases the flow of oxygen to our brains, improving our cognitive functions and alertness.

Wild Sage, scientifically known as Salvia officinalis, has a long history as a medicinal herb and is still highly regarded for it’s therapeutic properties. Sage was officially listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1840 to 1900. Sage is an antiseptic, anti-spasmodic, a relaxant, calms inflammation, and has been associated with improved memory.

Wild Sage Hydrosol is a wonderful facial toner for oily and blemish prone skin. It is also a safe and gentle addition to your natural bug repellent routine. Adding Bug Repellent Concentrate to your Sage Hydrosol is a safe and gentle way to naturally repel bugs. 

Wild Sage Hydrosol is a fantastic smokeless smudging option when smudging might not be appropriate or accessible. Smoke can exacerbate some conditions. Many people have a sensitivity to either smoke or strong odors, and smudging safely takes time and your attention. Wild Sage Hydrosol can be sprayed into the air, on fabric and skin, and is gentle and safe enough to use around children and pets. Perfect for use before your yoga practice to prepare your home or studio for class, meditation, massage, or your personal practice.

To use simply spray around the perimeter of the space and then work your way inward in concentric circles.

Happy smudging!


article by: Beth Onward

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